[nyfoil-l] THE PERPETUAL MOMENT -- Visions from within Okinawa and Korea

saadia toor saadiatoor at yahoo.com
Tue Oct 5 20:10:27 CDT 2004


> > >***PLEASE FORWARD***
> > >
> > >THE PERPETUAL MOMENT -- VISIONS FROM WITHIN
OKINAWA
> > AND KOREA
> > >
> > >A documentary photography exhibit and panel
> > discussion
> > >on the US Military in Okinawa and Korea
> > >
> > >Okinawan Artists ~ Toyomitsu Higa, Mao Ishikawa
> > >South Korean Artists ~ Ahn Haeryong, Noh
Soon-taek,
> > Lee Yong-Nam, Lee Zegabu
> > >
> > >PHOTO EXHIBIT (see description below)
> > >dates: October 17~December 13, 2004
> > >location: MOMA's PS 1 Contemporary Art Center,
> > 22-25 Jackson Ave at 46th
> > >Ave, Long Island City (Queens)
> > >hours: noon to 6pm, Thursday through Monday
> > >For more information or directions, call
> > 718.784.2084 or see www.ps1.org
> > >
> > >PANEL DISCUSSION: A slide presentation and
dialogue
> > with the artists, in
> > >conjunction with the exhibit at PS 1-MOMA
> > >date: Tuesday, October 19, 2004
> > >time: 6pm - 9pm
> > >location: Teachers College, Columbia University,
> > 525 West 120th St.,
> > >between Columbus and Amsterdam (Room number will
be
> > posted at the main
> > >entrance to the college.)
> > >For more information, contact the Peace Education
> > Center, Teachers
> > >College, (212) 678-8116.
> > >
> > >THE PERPETUAL MOMENT -- VISIONS FROM WITHIN
OKINAWA
> > AND KOREA
> > >
> > >Henri Cartier Bresson (d. August, 2004),
co-founder
> > of the photographers'
> > >collective MAGNUM, has cast a spell on all those
> > who take pictures, pros
> > >and amateurs alike. This exhibition references
> > Henri Cartier Bressons
> > >seminal book The Decisive Moment(1952).
> > >
> > >What is the difference between the decisive
moment
> > for photography and
> > >that of history?  Cartier Bresson may be a
champion
> > of the decisive moment
> > >for photography, but the concerned photographers,
> > or the conscientious
> > >photographers, of this exhibition reveal how one
> > decisive moment persists
> > >over time, and we aim to examine two pressing
> > issues.
> > >
> > >First, to what extent can these documentary
> > photographs of facts persuade
> > >the viewer to reflect upon the complex history
that
> > gave rise to the
> > >reality depicted here? And, to what extent can
they
> > empower an emotional
> > >yet rational judgment so that one might decipher
> > truth and justice?
> > >Second, can we argue about documentary
photography
> > in the context of the
> > >paradigm of contemporary art? This exhibition
> > attempts to answer these
> > >recurring questions.
> > >
> > >Contemporary art has continued to devise
effective
> > and ingenious ways to
> > >reveal the reality of our time and the truth of
the
> > here and now.
> > >Documentary photography, with its raison detre
> > rooted in facts, is a field
> > >in which the practitioner's motive and his/her
> > motif are irreversible. In
> > >documentary photography, is not the formation of
> > individual identity and
> > >the reality of the world today quite clearly
> > discernible?
> > >
> > >The French humanist Andre Malraux says that the
> > starting point for Modern
> > >Art is the moment when art was separated from
> > beauty. In particular, he
> > >refers to Francisco de Goya's images of the
> > atrocities of war from the
> > >18th Century. With the development of
photographic
> > technology starting
> > >some 150 years ago, human pain, anguish and
> > struggle not to mention love,
> > >joy and happiness have been depicted in numerous
> > photographic images. The
> > >20th Century is labeled with bloodstained regret
as
> > A Century of Wars,and
> > >in those 100 years even more photographs were
taken
> > of battles and wars,
> > >and of the plights of the people and places they
> > affected. The vault of
> > >news photographs was possible only because this
> > regrettable historical
> > >experience existed and persisted.
> > >
> > >In the arena of news photography and
> > photojournalism (until recently),
> > >many of the photographs we have seen through the
> > mass media machine were
> > >taken by professionals who were outsiders, that
is,
> > removed from the
> > >places and people they depicted. To name two,
> > Robert Capa documented the
> > >Spanish Civil War (he died in Asia due to a land
> > mine explosion) and
> > >Margaret Bourke-White, in turn, the Korean War
and
> > Indias War for
> > >independence (Gandhi was assassinated just after
> > she took his portrait).
> > >Our memory of the 20th Century is inseparable
from
> > the (these?) images
> > >left behind.
> > >
> > >The images on view here, however, are not of
> > battles or even battlefields
> > >per se. They are images of military bases and the
> > reality that surrounds
> > >them, far away from the homeland of their base
> > operators as well as from
> > >the battlefronts. These bases exist within the
> > territories of third-party
> > >nation states. They are US military bases that
have
> > been in existence
> > >since 1945 in Okinawa (designated as a part of
> > Japanese territory) and on
> > >the Korean Peninsula (where the Korean nation is
> > still divided). These
> > >photographs reveal the lives and suffering, as
well
> > as the joy and relief,
> > >of the local sovereign people living in these
> > areas.
> > >
> > >The photographs have a distinctive feature. They
> > were taken through the
> > >eyes of insiders, through the eyes of privies.
Now,
> > almost 150 years after
> > >the invention of the camera, these expert
> > photographs tell the story of
> > >their reality in a tone deeper and more
polyphonic
> > than that of outsiders,
> > >echoing the decisive moment of their history.
None
> > of these photographers
> > >were dispatched by LIFE magazine, UPI, AFP, or
any
> > other international
> > >news agencies. They are witnesses of the here and
> > now, capturing their own
> > >place and history from within. The historically
> > decisive moment in 1945
> > >still persists here. These photographers are
aware
> > that the causality that
> > >was triggered then persists not only in their
land
> > but also throughout the
> > >world, prevailing as an oppressive
socio-political
> > reality. Jean-Paul
> > >Sartre asked, Can literature rescue starving
> > children?These photographers
> > >ask themselves, Can photography rescue us? Rescue
> > our world?
> > >
> > >In April of 1945, US Forces, under the auspices
of
> > the Allied Forces,
> > >landed in Okinawa in the southern-most part of
> > Japan for a final lethal
> > >attack, and 150,000 people (one out of four of
the
> > Okinawan population)
> > >died, including non-combatant civilians. In fact,
> > there were a significant
> > >number of mobilized local students, who were
> > ordered by Japanese military
> > >commanders to commit suicide, as well as families
> > and classmates ordered
> > >to kill one another in order to escape
humiliation
> > by the enemy.Japan
> > >surrendered unconditionally to the Allied Forces
on
> > August 15th.
> > >
> > >In September of that same year, US Forces arrived
> > on the Korean Peninsula
> > >by way of the Inchon Harbor to liberate the
Koreans
> > from a 36-year-long
> > >Japanese colonial rule. A crowd of Koreans
gathered
> > to welcome the
> > >Americans, but in the midst of the turmoil, two
> > Koreans were shot to death
> > >by Japanese policemen and ten were injured.
Richard
> > E. Rauterbuk, a New
> > >York Times correspondent, reported that the
> > shooting had been ordered by
> > >the US military. An event that marked a dire
first
> > encounter between the
> > >Korea and the US, each  under the spell of a
> > persisting Japanese prejudice
> > >towards Korea. Later, the post-war East-West
> > (liberal vs. communist)
> > >confrontation aggravated the situation in the
> > Korean Peninsula, and ever
> > >since the 1950 eruption of the Korean War, the
> > Koreans have been subject
> > >to the pain of living in divided territories.
> > >
> > >US military bases have remained in the Okinawa
> > Archipelago and the Korean
> > >Peninsula for almost 60 years now. The
destinations
> > of their fighters and
> > >aircraft carriers have shifted and their weapons
> > and training programs
> > >have been transformed, but the problems these
> > foreign military bases cause
> > >are becoming increasingly worse. Their harmful
> > effects on the local
> > >population's life and sovereignty, if not on the
> > environment in general,
> > >are becoming far more complicated over time. The
> > citizens of these
> > >occupied areas have been living on the periphery
of
> > war for more than half
> > >a century. Through their own poignant reality,
they
> > witness the perpetual
> > >moment of history. Hence, the decisive moment
> > persists on into the future,
> > >and once triggered, the moment never reaches an
> > end. Causality and
> > >justice. To what extent can concrete images of
> > reality empower human
> > >reason and emotion?
> > >
> > ><><><>
> > >
> > >This exhibition is organized by P.S.1 Adjunct
> > Curator Kazue Kobata.
> > >
> > >Support for this exhibition provided by "Friends
of
> > The Perpetual Moment
> > >-- Visions from within Okinawa and Korea(Okinawa,
> > Osaka, Tokyo, Seoul,
> > >Paju, Daegu, Pyeongtaek, New York).
> > >
> > >On the day of the opening between the hours of 4
> > and 5pm, there will be a
> > >performance of Okinawan traditional dance and
music
> > by members of the
> > >Okinawa American Association of New York (OAANY).
> > >



		
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